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Education Costs Soared 6 % Last Year

Posted January. 14, 2008 07:21,   

한국어

Last year saw educational costs jump six percent as school tuitions and private tutoring costs rose by large margins. With a hike in education costs, 2.4 times higher than the overall consumer price growth, parents are suffering from a growing financial burden.

According to the National Statistical Office (NSO), the overall consumer price rose by 2.5 percent in 2007 from a year earlier and education-related costs recorded the highest increase of six percent, a four-year high since 2003 (6.0 %).

Rises in tuition fees for kindergartens, colleges and graduate schools and the prices of various study-aid books and private institute costs resulted in the overall hike in education spending, according to the statistical office. Kindergartens raised their tuition fees 9.2 percent last year, the highest among education-related items. Tuition fees for state-funded graduate schools and universities and two-year colleges rose 8.8 percent, 8.6 percent and 7.3 percent, respectively, compared to a year earlier. Those for private universities and graduate schools also grew by 7 percent and 6.5 percent, each.

Last year, parents also had to pay more for private tutoring than a year ago. Prices of study-aid materials increased 7.8 percent and costs of private institutes rose 5.6 percent. Students paid 6.5 percent more to attend private institutes for the college entrance exam and those who prepared for the high school entrance exam had to pay 5 percent more to enroll in private institutes. Fees for various exams such as TOEIC and Word Processor certification jumped 5.3 percent from a year earlier, placing additional burdens on the youth who prepare for employment.

Costs of enrollment in foreign language institutes grew 5.9 percent and institutes for preparing employment 4.3 percent.

Parents also suffered from price hikes in various items though they are not included in education-related items. School uniform prices for male and female students both jumped 2.8 percent and 3.7 percent, respectively, higher than the growth of consumer prices.



parky@donga.com